Scottish DNA study

Post Reply

Topic author
Talorgan MacDerelei Great Britain
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 2:27 pm
Location: Scotland
Ethnicity: Pictish
Y-DNA haplogroup: R1b L21
mtDNA haplogroup: H3
Gender: man
Has thanked: 58 times
Been thanked: 178 times

Scottish DNA study

Post by Talorgan MacDerelei » Fri Sep 06, 2019 1:29 pm

New study of Scottish DNA. Thankfully they've tried to address the problem of the rather selective sampling used in the POBI study (which severely under-sampled large swathes of Scotland) to give a more rounded analysis of Scotland's DNA.

https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019 ... 1904761116

Topic author
Talorgan MacDerelei Great Britain
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 2:27 pm
Location: Scotland
Ethnicity: Pictish
Y-DNA haplogroup: R1b L21
mtDNA haplogroup: H3
Gender: man
Has thanked: 58 times
Been thanked: 178 times

Re: Scottish DNA study

Post by Talorgan MacDerelei » Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:41 pm

This is from the supplementary materials. https://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/suppl ... 6.sapp.pdf
The Dark Age Kingdoms of north Britain cast long shadows in the genetics of Scots today.
The great northeast to southwest genetic divide which we observe in Scotland reflects remarkably
closely the boundaries of Pictland in the northeast and Dál Riata and Strathclyde in the southwestArgyll
maps directly onto the Scottish borders of Dál Riata, even including an individual with ancestry from the
very north coast of Ireland. Members of Sco-Ire map the extent of the Dark Age Brythonic Kingdom of Strathclyde.
This P-Celtic Kingdom groups with Q-Celtic clusters (Argyll) – reflecting, perhaps, population turnover dating to the
conquest of the region by the Gaelic Kingdom of Alba. The distribution of the NE group of clusters (N Scotland, Inverness, Buchan-Moray, Aberdeenshire,
Tayside-Fife) corresponds tightly with the land of the Picts – evidenced both in the distribution of
typical carved Pictish symbol stones and Pictish place-names. The legacy of the later Norse Jarldom of Orkney and its Scandinavian admixture drives the differentiation of both the Northern Isles and the
north of Scotland. This Jarldom may further explain the genetic continuum of N Scotland (whose region fell under the rule of the Jarldom) between mainland Scotland and the Northern Isles. Ancient
DNA will be required to clarify the historical context of these correlations (my italics)
.
Without ancient DNA these findings are very speculative. The Wellcome Trust seem very keen to link modern genetic clusters to Dark Age Kingdoms as if the Dark Ages was the decisive period when all modern genetic clusters were formed, but this is not necessarily the case. The importance of the Dark Ages (a period of around 400-800 years) in studying genetics in Britain and Ireland is, in my opinion, over-inflated given that we are talking about thousands of years of human habitation in the Isles.

(I probably shouldn't have put this study link in the Ancient DNA forum given that it doesn't contain any ancient DNA)
Post Reply

Return to “Ancient DNA (aDNA)”